Tuesday, 01 March 2011 10:48
alt
When Sleuthfest first began, it was among a handful of conferences across the country.
That was about 20 years ago and the world -- and especially the mystery fiction world -- has changed.
Now there are so many regional conferences that it's hard to keep track of them all.
What hasn't changed is that Sleuthfest is still one of the few conferences that is geared for writers, not fans. Of course, fans are always welcomed, but Sleuthfest is mainly for writers -- published and unpublished. It is one of the few conferences that has panels for writing and for crime scene detection.
Sleuthfest begins March 3, with the workshop Third Degree Thursday and continues March 4-6. Editors, agents, authors and forensic experts will be on hand to discuss writing.
And did I mention that Sleuthfest is in Fort Lauderdale. In March? And the organizers can pretty much guarantee it won't snow.
Registration is $255 for MWA members; $275 for nonmembers. The rate includes some meals. One-day attendance also is available. Information and registration is at www.sleuthfest.com.
As in years past, Sleuthfest will have two guests of honor. Edgar winner Meg Gardiner, author of “The Liar's Lullaby” and “The Dirty Secrets Club,” will be the Friday guest. Multi-award winner Dennis Lehane, author of “Mystic River,” “Gone Baby Gone” and “Shutter Island,” will be the guest of honor Saturday.
Sleuthfest will feature other authors. S.J. Rozan will be the spotlight speaker during the Third Degree Thursday.
Les Standiford and Joe Matthews will discuss their nonfiction book Bringing Adam Home: The Abduction That Changed America, about the Adam Walsh case.
In addition, mystery authors James W. Hall, Michael Koryta, Dana Cameron, Deborah Crombie, Lisa Unger, Julie Compton, Marcia Talley, PJ Parrish, Lisa Black, Lisa Unger, Toni Kelner, James Benn, Lori Roy, Wallace Stroby, Michael Palmer, Daniel Palmer, Jonathon King, Elaine Viets and more will attend.
Lots to Learn at Sleuthfest
Oline Cogdill
lots-to-learn-at-sleuthfest
alt
When Sleuthfest first began, it was among a handful of conferences across the country.
That was about 20 years ago and the world -- and especially the mystery fiction world -- has changed.
Now there are so many regional conferences that it's hard to keep track of them all.
What hasn't changed is that Sleuthfest is still one of the few conferences that is geared for writers, not fans. Of course, fans are always welcomed, but Sleuthfest is mainly for writers -- published and unpublished. It is one of the few conferences that has panels for writing and for crime scene detection.
Sleuthfest begins March 3, with the workshop Third Degree Thursday and continues March 4-6. Editors, agents, authors and forensic experts will be on hand to discuss writing.
And did I mention that Sleuthfest is in Fort Lauderdale. In March? And the organizers can pretty much guarantee it won't snow.
Registration is $255 for MWA members; $275 for nonmembers. The rate includes some meals. One-day attendance also is available. Information and registration is at www.sleuthfest.com.
As in years past, Sleuthfest will have two guests of honor. Edgar winner Meg Gardiner, author of “The Liar's Lullaby” and “The Dirty Secrets Club,” will be the Friday guest. Multi-award winner Dennis Lehane, author of “Mystic River,” “Gone Baby Gone” and “Shutter Island,” will be the guest of honor Saturday.
Sleuthfest will feature other authors. S.J. Rozan will be the spotlight speaker during the Third Degree Thursday.
Les Standiford and Joe Matthews will discuss their nonfiction book Bringing Adam Home: The Abduction That Changed America, about the Adam Walsh case.
In addition, mystery authors James W. Hall, Michael Koryta, Dana Cameron, Deborah Crombie, Lisa Unger, Julie Compton, Marcia Talley, PJ Parrish, Lisa Black, Lisa Unger, Toni Kelner, James Benn, Lori Roy, Wallace Stroby, Michael Palmer, Daniel Palmer, Jonathon King, Elaine Viets and more will attend.
Wednesday, 23 February 2011 10:44
altFor the past three years, I have had the honor to be a judge for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in the mystery/thriller category.

This has been the best experience I have ever had being a judge. That's mainly because of the other judges with whom I served—Sarah Weinman and Dick Lochte.
The three of us were focused on choosing the best novels we could.

altWe started with an incredibly long list that we kept narrowing down and narrowing down. That's good news because it means the three of us thought that 2010 was a very good year for mysteries.

Too many times judges let their egos get away from them and they focus on their own agendas, not on the nominees .

I can say proudly that never happened with the three of us. I would serve as a judge anywhere, anytime with Sarah and Dick.
So here is what you really want to know:

altThe 2010 Los Angeles Times Book Prizes will be awarded April 29, 2011, in a ceremony at the Los Angeles Times building.
Mystery/Thriller category nominees:

Tom Franklin, Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter (William Morrow)

Tana French, Faithful Place (Viking)
french_faithfulplace
stanley_cityofdragonsLaura Lippman, I’d Know You Anywhere (William Morrow)
Stuart Neville, Collusion (SoHo Press) (Neville is featured in the latest issue of Mystery Scene)
Kelli Stanley, City of Dragons (Minotaur Books/A Thomas Dunne Book)
Congratulations to the nominees.
L.A. Times Book Prize Nominees
Oline Cogdill
lag-times-book-prize-nominees
altFor the past three years, I have had the honor to be a judge for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in the mystery/thriller category.

This has been the best experience I have ever had being a judge. That's mainly because of the other judges with whom I served—Sarah Weinman and Dick Lochte.
The three of us were focused on choosing the best novels we could.

altWe started with an incredibly long list that we kept narrowing down and narrowing down. That's good news because it means the three of us thought that 2010 was a very good year for mysteries.

Too many times judges let their egos get away from them and they focus on their own agendas, not on the nominees .

I can say proudly that never happened with the three of us. I would serve as a judge anywhere, anytime with Sarah and Dick.
So here is what you really want to know:

altThe 2010 Los Angeles Times Book Prizes will be awarded April 29, 2011, in a ceremony at the Los Angeles Times building.
Mystery/Thriller category nominees:

Tom Franklin, Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter (William Morrow)

Tana French, Faithful Place (Viking)
french_faithfulplace
stanley_cityofdragonsLaura Lippman, I’d Know You Anywhere (William Morrow)
Stuart Neville, Collusion (SoHo Press) (Neville is featured in the latest issue of Mystery Scene)
Kelli Stanley, City of Dragons (Minotaur Books/A Thomas Dunne Book)
Congratulations to the nominees.
Friday, 18 February 2011 01:27
Last month we had the nominees for the Edgar Awards; now it's time for Malice Domestic's Agatha Award nominees.

Malice Domestic 23 will be April 29-May 1 at the Hyatt Regency Hotel, Bethesda, MD. The Agatha Awards will be given out during the Agatha Awards banquet to be held on Saturday, April 30.
Congratulations to all the nominees.
2010 Agatha Award Nominees

Best Novel:
Stork Raving Mad by Donna Andrews (Minotaur)
Bury Your Dead by Louise Penny (Minotaur)
The Scent of Rain and Lightning by Nancy Pickard (Ballantine)
Drive Time by Hank Phillippi Ryan (Mira)
Truly, Madly by Heather Webber (St. Martin's Paperbacks)

Best First Novel:
The Long Quiche Goodbye by Avery Aames (Berkley)
Murder at the PTA by Laura Alden (Signet)
Maid of Murder by Amanda Flower (Five Star/Gale)
Full Mortality by Sasscer Hill (Wildside Press)
Diamonds for the Dead by Alan Orloff (Midnight Ink)
Best Nonfiction:
The Poisoner's Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York by Deborah Blum (Penguin)
Agatha Christie's Secret Notebooks: 50 Years of Mysteries in the Making by John Curran (Harper)
Sherlock Holmes for Dummies by Stephen Doyle & David A. Crowder (For Dummies)
Have Faith in Your Kitchen by Katherine Hall Page (Orchises Press)
Charlie Chan: The Untold Story of the Honorable Detective and His Rendezvous with American History by Yunte Huang (W.W. Norton & Co.)
Best Short Story:
"Swing Shift" by Dana Cameron, Crimes by Moonlight (Berkley)
"Size Matters" by Sheila Connolly, Thin Ice (Level Best Books)
"Volunteer of the Year" by Barb Goffman, Chesapeake Crimes: They Had it Comin' (Wildside Press)
"So Much in Common" by Mary Jane Maffini, Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine - Sept./Oct. 2010
"The Green Cross" by Liz Zelvin, Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine - August 2010
Best Children's/Young Adult:
Theodore Boone, Kid Lawyer by John Grisham (Dutton Children's)
Theodosia and the Eyes of Horus by R. L. LaFevers (Houghton Mifflin)
The Agency: A Spy in the House by Y. S. Lee (Candlewick)
Virals by Kathy Reichs (Razorbill)
The Other Side of Dark by Sarah Smith (Atheneum)
Agatha Award Nominees Announced
Oline Cogdill
agatha-award-nominees-announced
Last month we had the nominees for the Edgar Awards; now it's time for Malice Domestic's Agatha Award nominees.

Malice Domestic 23 will be April 29-May 1 at the Hyatt Regency Hotel, Bethesda, MD. The Agatha Awards will be given out during the Agatha Awards banquet to be held on Saturday, April 30.
Congratulations to all the nominees.
2010 Agatha Award Nominees

Best Novel:
Stork Raving Mad by Donna Andrews (Minotaur)
Bury Your Dead by Louise Penny (Minotaur)
The Scent of Rain and Lightning by Nancy Pickard (Ballantine)
Drive Time by Hank Phillippi Ryan (Mira)
Truly, Madly by Heather Webber (St. Martin's Paperbacks)

Best First Novel:
The Long Quiche Goodbye by Avery Aames (Berkley)
Murder at the PTA by Laura Alden (Signet)
Maid of Murder by Amanda Flower (Five Star/Gale)
Full Mortality by Sasscer Hill (Wildside Press)
Diamonds for the Dead by Alan Orloff (Midnight Ink)
Best Nonfiction:
The Poisoner's Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York by Deborah Blum (Penguin)
Agatha Christie's Secret Notebooks: 50 Years of Mysteries in the Making by John Curran (Harper)
Sherlock Holmes for Dummies by Stephen Doyle & David A. Crowder (For Dummies)
Have Faith in Your Kitchen by Katherine Hall Page (Orchises Press)
Charlie Chan: The Untold Story of the Honorable Detective and His Rendezvous with American History by Yunte Huang (W.W. Norton & Co.)
Best Short Story:
"Swing Shift" by Dana Cameron, Crimes by Moonlight (Berkley)
"Size Matters" by Sheila Connolly, Thin Ice (Level Best Books)
"Volunteer of the Year" by Barb Goffman, Chesapeake Crimes: They Had it Comin' (Wildside Press)
"So Much in Common" by Mary Jane Maffini, Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine - Sept./Oct. 2010
"The Green Cross" by Liz Zelvin, Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine - August 2010
Best Children's/Young Adult:
Theodore Boone, Kid Lawyer by John Grisham (Dutton Children's)
Theodosia and the Eyes of Horus by R. L. LaFevers (Houghton Mifflin)
The Agency: A Spy in the House by Y. S. Lee (Candlewick)
Virals by Kathy Reichs (Razorbill)
The Other Side of Dark by Sarah Smith (Atheneum)