Author Topic: March Feature: Mysteries in or about Ireland (and Scotland, too)  (Read 35235 times)

JRob

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Re: March Feature: Mysteries in or about Ireland (and Scotland, too)
« Reply #15 on: March 05, 2020, 06:35:45 pm »
That's a lot of reading to check out. The library will be getting a workout from me.

Becke Davis

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Re: March Feature: Mysteries in or about Ireland (and Scotland, too)
« Reply #16 on: March 05, 2020, 07:22:56 pm »
I'm kind of afraid to go to the library right now. My recent visit to Barnes & Noble has made me itchy to read the new books I bought there.

Becke Davis

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Re: March Feature: Mysteries in or about Ireland (and Scotland, too)
« Reply #17 on: March 08, 2020, 09:03:51 pm »
What is it that draws you to books set in Ireland and Scotland?

I've never been to Ireland, but my parents had been there several times and loved it. My sister-in-law was born in Scotland and still has family there. She and my brother have been there several times, too. My husband and I have been to Scotland once, when we were living in London and living on a pittance. When we learned about a British Rail special - an overnight train from London to Edinburgh, including admission to the Edinburgh Tattoo for just 3 pounds each (less than $10), we jumped at the chance. It wasn't exactly comfortable on the train but we were very glad we took that opportunity to see Edinburgh Castle, Greyfriars Bobby, and the Firth of Forth. Someday I'd like to visit Loch Ness and Loch Morar. I have a friend in Scotland, and it would be great to visit him one day. I should probably start buying lottery tickets!

Have any of you been to Scotland and/or Ireland? What were your favorite things?


JRob

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Re: March Feature: Mysteries in or about Ireland (and Scotland, too)
« Reply #19 on: March 09, 2020, 03:54:38 am »
I think what draws me is the fact that I'm of Irish descent. It seems kind of a lame reason but growing up the Irish part of my ancestry was played up.

I've never been to Ireland or Scotland but those are two of the very few places I'd like to visit if I could someday.

And I love the Sheila Connolly series.

Becke Davis

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Re: March Feature: Mysteries in or about Ireland (and Scotland, too)
« Reply #20 on: March 09, 2020, 06:05:40 pm »
I think what draws me is the fact that I'm of Irish descent. It seems kind of a lame reason but growing up the Irish part of my ancestry was played up.

I've never been to Ireland or Scotland but those are two of the very few places I'd like to visit if I could someday.

And I love the Sheila Connolly series.

There are a lot of redheads in my family (mine used to be red) and people always assumed we were Irish. My parents didn't think we had any Irish connections. Then I got a hold of a journal my great-grandfather wrote, and he described his wife as being "Scots-Irish." For about 10 years, I became a genealogy detective. I found Irish connections on both my mom's side and my dad's side of the family. We're primarily English and French, and according to a DNA search, there is a small percentage of Scandinavian in my family tree, too. I haven't pinned that line down yet - I'm kind of dubious about it.

Anyway, I totally understand why you would be intrigued about Ireland because of family ties. Very cool!

Denise

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Re: March Feature: Mysteries in or about Ireland (and Scotland, too)
« Reply #21 on: March 12, 2020, 02:38:15 am »
I'm half Irish. When I was twelve, my family traveled to Europe, and our first stop was in Ireland, where we rented a car and drove around. I don't remember seeing many sites, except the Waterford factory, and a convent, I think. We first stayed in Adare, in a hotel where Teddy Kennedy had stayed, and where I was bitten by a dog. Two small dogs were let out of a room, ran down the hall, and one immediately bit me in the ankle! I had to see a doctor. The owner of the dogs was a senile "Sir Timothy", and couldn't remember if they had had their rabies shots. Luckily, I survived! Then we spent a couple of days at the Great Western Hotel in Killarney, and after that, drove around the Ring of Kerry and stayed there for a night (I think Teddy had stayed there, too).

I don't think I have any Irish mysteries, but I do have a number of books of Irish fairy tales and legends, and ghosts.
"Poirot," I said. "I have been thinking."  "An admirable exercise, my friend. Continue it." - Agatha Christie, Peril at End House

JRob

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Re: March Feature: Mysteries in or about Ireland (and Scotland, too)
« Reply #22 on: March 12, 2020, 03:52:02 am »
Denise, I have just one book of Irish fairy tales and legends. I actually bought it to give someone as a Christmas present but ended up giving them something else instead after I forgot that I had bought the book for them.

Becke Davis

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Re: March Feature: Mysteries in or about Ireland (and Scotland, too)
« Reply #23 on: March 12, 2020, 06:47:49 pm »
I'm half Irish. When I was twelve, my family traveled to Europe, and our first stop was in Ireland, where we rented a car and drove around. I don't remember seeing many sites, except the Waterford factory, and a convent, I think. We first stayed in Adare, in a hotel where Teddy Kennedy had stayed, and where I was bitten by a dog. Two small dogs were let out of a room, ran down the hall, and one immediately bit me in the ankle! I had to see a doctor. The owner of the dogs was a senile "Sir Timothy", and couldn't remember if they had had their rabies shots. Luckily, I survived! Then we spent a couple of days at the Great Western Hotel in Killarney, and after that, drove around the Ring of Kerry and stayed there for a night (I think Teddy had stayed there, too).

I don't think I have any Irish mysteries, but I do have a number of books of Irish fairy tales and legends, and ghosts.

You had quite an adventure - thank goodness you didn't have to get rabies shots! I think they have a simple method of vaccinating for rabies now, but it was horrific back in the day!

Denise

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Re: March Feature: Mysteries in or about Ireland (and Scotland, too)
« Reply #24 on: March 14, 2020, 10:38:10 pm »
Denise, I have just one book of Irish fairy tales and legends. I actually bought it to give someone as a Christmas present but ended up giving them something else instead after I forgot that I had bought the book for them.

Did you end up reading it yourself? I have one edited by Yeats, and I think another has illustrations by Rackham.
"Poirot," I said. "I have been thinking."  "An admirable exercise, my friend. Continue it." - Agatha Christie, Peril at End House

JRob

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Re: March Feature: Mysteries in or about Ireland (and Scotland, too)
« Reply #25 on: March 15, 2020, 07:59:48 am »
Denise, I have just one book of Irish fairy tales and legends. I actually bought it to give someone as a Christmas present but ended up giving them something else instead after I forgot that I had bought the book for them.

Did you end up reading it yourself? I have one edited by Yeats, and I think another has illustrations by Rackham.

I haven't read it myself. I'm always too busy with my mysteries and murders. :D

Becke Davis

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Re: March Feature: Mysteries in or about Ireland (and Scotland, too)
« Reply #26 on: March 21, 2020, 07:44:03 pm »
I went off-topic briefly and read Sarah Addison Allen's FIRST FROST yesterday; it's sort of a sequel to her best-seller, GARDEN SPELLS.
I loved it, but today I'm back to mysteries.

I'm reading a vintage mystery set in Scotland, with lots of atmosphere and a quirky cast of characters. The book is John Dickson Carr's THE CONSTANT SUICIDES - a Dr. Gideon Fell book. It's a locked room mystery published in 1941. I'm really enjoying it!

 https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1419648.The_Case_of_the_Constant_Suicides

Becke Davis

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Re: March Feature: Mysteries in or about Ireland (and Scotland, too)
« Reply #27 on: March 23, 2020, 02:17:33 am »
I went off-topic briefly and read Sarah Addison Allen's FIRST FROST yesterday; it's sort of a sequel to her best-seller, GARDEN SPELLS.
I loved it, but today I'm back to mysteries.

I'm reading a vintage mystery set in Scotland, with lots of atmosphere and a quirky cast of characters. The book is John Dickson Carr's THE CONSTANT SUICIDES - a Dr. Gideon Fell book. It's a locked room mystery published in 1941. I'm really enjoying it!

 https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1419648.The_Case_of_the_Constant_Suicides

I enjoyed THE CONSTANT SUICIDES - it has some silly scenes, drunken shenanigans and an "opposites attract" light romance, but the solution was interesting and the locked room aspects were well thought-out. Brian - I'm assuming this is already in your locked room compendium. Not an all-time favorite but worth a read.

JRob

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Re: March Feature: Mysteries in or about Ireland (and Scotland, too)
« Reply #28 on: March 23, 2020, 03:45:58 am »
I've got few Irish or Scottish-themed books in my TBR pile that I was hoping to get around to reading this month, but it has been a total failure on my part in that regard.

Becke Davis

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Re: March Feature: Mysteries in or about Ireland (and Scotland, too)
« Reply #29 on: March 23, 2020, 02:36:46 pm »
I've got few Irish or Scottish-themed books in my TBR pile that I was hoping to get around to reading this month, but it has been a total failure on my part in that regard.

I have at least 3 more in my pile, too. I'm just starting Molly MacRae's SCONES AND SCOUNDRELS. It's been in my TBR pile for awhile, and I'm in the mood for it today. I'm hoping to read one or more Scottish/Irish mystery before the end of the month.

But once we start these features, we don't have to cut them off just because we come to the end of the month. If you come across a good book that fits with any of our features, come back and tell us about it.

People who are new to the forum are welcome to add to any thread at any time.