English Proverb
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:49:37
"He that is born to be hanged shall never be drowned."

—English proverb
Oscar Wilde
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:50:23
"Wickedness is a myth invented by good people to account for the curious attractiveness of others."

—Oscar Wilde (1854-1900)
O. Henry
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:51:28
"A burglar who respects his art always takes his time before taking anything else."

—O. Henry (1862-1910), prolific U.S. short story writer
G.K. Chesterton
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:52:23
"Wit is a sword; it is meant to make people feel the point as well as see it."

—G.K. Chesterton (1874-1936), creator of the Father Brown mysteries
Orson Welles
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:53:40
"Power corrupts but lack of power corrupts absolutely."

—Orson Welles (1915-85), Screen International, 1990
Raymond Chandler
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:54:46
"If my book had been any worse I would not have been invited to Hollywood, and if they had been any better I would not have come."

—Raymond Chandler (1888-1959)
Alfred Hitchcock, Sunday Times
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:55:32
"Blondes are the best victims. They're like virgin snow which shows up the bloody footprints."

—Alfred Hitchcock, Sunday Times, 1973
Robert Mitchum
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:56:20
"I kept the same suit for six years—and the same dialogue. We just changed the title of the picture and the leading lady."

—Robert Mitchum, (1917-1997) U.S. actor
Philip Marlowe in Farewell, My Lovely
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:57:20
"It was a blonde. A blonde to make a bishop kick a hole in a stained glass window."

—Philip Marlowe in Farewell, My Lovely, 1940, by Raymond Chandler
Mr. Bradley to Mark Easterbrook, the Pale Horse
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:58:26
"Never say anything you’re mother shouldn’t hear about!"

—Mr. Bradley to Mark Easterbrook, The Pale Horse, 1961, by Agatha Christie
Susan Gabriel, Duplicate Keys
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 22:00:14
"You don't pay for anything by being dead. That's when you stop paying for it."

—Susan Gabriel, Duplicate Keys, 1984, by Jane Smiley
P.T. Barnum
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 22:01:19
"There's a sucker born every minute."
—P.T. Barnum, (1810-1891), U.S. showman
Vic Daniel, Down in the Valley
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 22:02:19
"Why is nothing ever simple? Why don't things have a beginning, a middle, then an end like a date with a Catholic girl?"

—Vic Daniel, Down in the Valley, 1989, by David M. Pierce
Desmond Maccarthy
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 22:03:21
"The authorities were at their wit's end, nor had it taken them long to get there."

—Desmond MacCarthy (1877-1952), British writer
Raymond Chandler, “the Simple Art of Murder”
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 22:04:13
"In everything that can be called art there is a quality of redemption."

— Raymond Chandler, “The Simple Art of Murder,” Atlantic Monthly, December, 1944
Richard Daley
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 22:05:51
"Get the thing straight once and for all. The policeman isn’t there to create disorder. The policeman is there to preserve disorder."

—Richard Daley, mayor Chicago
Al Capone
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 22:07:10
"Vote early and vote often."

—Al Capone (1899-1947), U.S. gangster
The Inconstant, Play by George Farquhar
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 22:08:19
"Crimes, like virtues, are their own rewards."

The Inconstant, play by George Farquhar (1678-1707)
The Dark Days of Hamburger Halpin
Roberta Rogow

The Dark Days of Hamburger Halpin, by Josh Berk, introduces overweight, snarky, and profoundly deaf Will Halpin. He’s left the safety of the “deaf school” for Carbon High School, and he’s ready to take on anything using his lip-reading skills and texting to communicate with the hearing world. It’s not easy, and it gets worse when Will and his only friend, class nerd Devon Smiley, are involved in what may or may not be an accidental death during a class field trip to a local abandoned coal mine. Was the popular, if caddish, football star pushed to his death? Suspects include an overly friendly teacher, a loutish school bus driver, and even the boy’s father’s political enemies. Research reveals new possibilities in an old local mystery, and Will solves both cases, and discovers not only a murderer but some family connections he never knew he had. A very different detective, and a look at a “hidden” disability.

Teri Duerr
2010-09-23 21:24:17

berk_darkdaysofhamburgerOverweight, sarcastic, deaf Will Halpin is on the case of a fatal high school field trip.

The Morgue and Me
Roberta Rogow

In The Morgue and Me, by John C. Ford, Christopher Newell takes on what is supposed to be a menial position in the town morgue as a summer job before starting college. He finds himself hip-deep in small-town scandal when he realizes that his boss has blatantly lied on a death certificate. There’s a dead man in the morgue with bullet holes in his chest and no one except Christopher seems to care about how he got them.

Christopher enlists the help of a hot-looking, tough-talking reporter, a stoner buddy, and several of his classmates to solve this mystery. Along the way he discovers that the world of the private detective holds many perils that television shows and movies prefer to ignore. The language of these teens is rough, but that’s the way it is, even in a small-town morgue!

Teri Duerr
2010-09-23 21:38:58

In The Morgue and Me, by John C. Ford, Christopher Newell takes on what is supposed to be a menial position in the town morgue as a summer job before starting college. He finds himself hip-deep in small-town scandal when he realizes that his boss has blatantly lied on a death certificate. There’s a dead man in the morgue with bullet holes in his chest and no one except Christopher seems to care about how he got them.

Christopher enlists the help of a hot-looking, tough-talking reporter, a stoner buddy, and several of his classmates to solve this mystery. Along the way he discovers that the world of the private detective holds many perils that television shows and movies prefer to ignore. The language of these teens is rough, but that’s the way it is, even in a small-town morgue!

Thrillers: 100 Must Reads
Jon L. Breen

Members of the International Thriller Writers cover key titles in their genre. Thriller is a notoriously flexible (and expandable) term, but Allison Brennan’s compact list of characteristics (“high stakes, something personal at risk, and strong pacing”) will do. Subjects range chronologically from Lee Child on Theseus and the Minotaur (1500 B.C.) to Steve Berry’s celebration of Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code (2003), the single exception to the 2000 cutoff date. Each essay includes a summary and appreciation of the book discussed, usually with a biography of the author. Among the contributors are major names in the field, and books covered include classics by Homer, Shakespeare, Defoe, and Dumas; early science fiction by Poe, Verne, and Wells; and horror landmarks like Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, and Robert Louis Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

Well represented are inevitable names like John Buchan, E. Phillips Oppenheim, W. Somerset Maugham, Eric Ambler, Geoffrey Household, and Graham Greene; and less expected mystery crossovers like Agatha Christie and Mickey Spillane. Writing on Doyle’s The Hound of the Baskervilles, Laura Benedict harmonizes thriller and detection, while Kathleen Sharp on a surprising cinematic inclusion, King Kong, resuscitates Edgar Wallace’s claim to its authorship. The last third or so of the list concentrates on living contemporaries, including John le Carré, Len Deighton, Joseph Wambaugh, Clive Cussler, Ken Follett, Thomas Harris, Tom Clancy, Stephen King, Dean Koontz, and Peter Straub; and recently deceased writers like Ross Thomas, Michael Crichton, John D. MacDonald, and Robert Ludlum. Appearing both as authors and subjects of essays are Lee Child, Katherine Neville, Justin Scott, editor Morrell, Gayle Lynds, David Baldacci, Jeffery Deaver, Sandra Brown, James Grady, and John Lescroart.

The selections and the essays are generally excellent, making the book a fine introduction to the range of thrillers. Quibbles over inclusions are inevitable. I was disappointed not to see Manning Coles, Donald Hamilton, Victor Canning, or Charlotte Armstrong. Scott Turow would have been a better choice to represent the legal thriller than John Grisham, who like Spillane is more a commercial phenomenon than an artistic trailblazer. In the “What About Murder?” test kitchens, I tried a couple of the hundred I’d previously missed. Nelson DeMille’s The Charm School (1988) is intelligent and absorbing, a true genre classic, and I’m grateful for the tip; but I can’t imagine why a novel as derivative and definitively dreadful as James Patterson’s Along Came a Spider (1992) was included.

Teri Duerr
2010-09-23 21:46:19

morrell_100thrillermustreadsMembers of the International Thriller Writers cover favorites of their genre.

A Local Habitation
Deb Andolina

“I am basically a mystery reader but I do read some fantasy such as books from Mercedes Lackey, Barbara Hambly and Jim Butcher. When I read the synopsis for Rosemary and Rue, the first October Daye novel from Seanan McGuire, I thought here’s another one that will pretend to be a mystery but is really an "urban fantasy." Then I started the book. It was a true PI novel, but with mythological references and a storyline that called to my imagination. I was thrilled there was a second book available—A Local Habitation. That one is even better. These are books I can read again and maybe even again to get all of the twists and turns and snappy dialogue."

Teri Duerr
2010-09-24 19:10:53

“I am basically a mystery reader but I do read some fantasy such as books from Mercedes Lackey, Barbara Hambly and Jim Butcher. When I read the synopsis for Rosemary and Rue, the first October Daye novel from Seanan McGuire, I thought here’s another one that will pretend to be a mystery but is really an "urban fantasy." Then I started the book. It was a true PI novel, but with mythological references and a storyline that called to my imagination. I was thrilled there was a second book available—A Local Habitation. That one is even better. These are books I can read again and maybe even again to get all of the twists and turns and snappy dialogue."

Let the Dead Lie
J. Michael Daniel

“I would like to recommend Let The Dead Lie by Malla Nunn (With Malla towards Nunn?). Set in South Africa, this second in a series is very good at presenting life before segregation ended there. A bit brutal in spots, but well worth your time.”

Teri Duerr
2010-09-24 22:26:25

“I would like to recommend Let The Dead Lie by Malla Nunn (With Malla towards Nunn?). Set in South Africa, this second in a series is very good at presenting life before segregation ended there. A bit brutal in spots, but well worth your time.”

Arcadia Falls
Sherrie Bouldin

Carol Goodman’s Arcadia Falls: “The absolutely perfect gothic mystery.”

Teri Duerr
2010-09-24 22:30:05

Carol Goodman’s Arcadia Falls: “The absolutely perfect gothic mystery.”

False Mermaid
M. Dorrell

Anything by Erin Hart. “She writes about the bog people in Ireland—a contemporary American paleontologist and an Irish detective...fascinating and excellent stories.”

Teri Duerr
2010-09-24 22:33:27

Anything by Erin Hart. “She writes about the bog people in Ireland—a contemporary American paleontologist and an Irish detective...fascinating and excellent stories.”