Happy 120th Agatha Christie!
Staff

christie_agatha_at_greenway

Celebrate the 120th anniversary of Agatha Christie with Mystery Scene and the Barnes and Noble Book Club

All this week Mystery Scene Editor, and former Director of the Agatha Christie Society, Kate Stine, will moderate "Where in the World is Agatha Christie?" a tour of special places from the life of "The Queen of Crime" including:

  • Christie's hometown of Torquay, England
  • Christie's holiday escape on her Greenway Estate
  • St. Martin's Theatre in London
  • Christie on the Orient Express
  • Christie in New york City
  • Plus a list of Kate's favorite Christie reads

Other B&N Agatha Christie and mystery threads can also be explored here.

Teri Duerr
2010-09-16 14:53:08

Celebrate the 120th anniversary of Agatha Christie with Mystery Scene and the B&N Book Club.

Mystery Crime Time Tv
Teri Duerr

September means new TV and new crime time pleasures... Here's the buzz on the best of the fall lineup.


Boardwalk Empire on HBO
Boardwalk Empire
Debuts Sept. 19, 2010 on HBO
When Martin Scorsese (Goodfellas) and Terence Winter (The Sopranos) whip up a cinematically stunning, $65 million production about Prohibiton-era style politics, gambling, and thuggery on the picturesque boardwalk of Atlantic City... It's at least worth a look. Featuring Steve Buscemi as the bug-eyed, bad-to-the-wallet politician Nucky Thompson, based on the real-life Enoch "Nucky" Johnson of the times.



Chase on NBC
Chase
Debuts Sept. 20, 2010 on NBC
Emmy-award wining producer Jerry Bruckheimer (CSI franchise) brings viewers tough Texas US Marshall Annie Frost (Kelli Giddish) in this fast-paced action-drama. Also on the elite team are cowboy Jimmy Godfrey (Cole Hauser), intelligence expert Marco Martinez (Amaury Nolasco of Prison Break), weapons specialist Daisy Ogbaa (Rose Rollins), and eager rookie outsider Luke Watson (Jesse Metcalfe).



Hawaii Five-0
Hawaii Five-O
Debuts Sept. 20, 2010 on CBS
New and old fans alike will be interested in this update of the original classic series, which ran from 1968-1980 and starred Jack Lord as Detective Steve McGarrett. Alex O'Loughlin takes a stab at the new Steve McGarrett, head of the special Hawaii task force. Rounding out the team is ex-New Jersey cop Danny "Danno" WIlliams (Scott Caan), Hawaiian Detective Chin Ho Kelly (Daniel Dae Kim, Lost), and Chin's rookie cousin, Kono Kalakaua (Grace Park, Battlestar Galactica).



Undercovers on NBC
Undercovers
Debuts Sept. 22, 2010 on NBC
J.J. Abrams (Star Trek, Lost, Alias) and Josh Reims (Brothers and Sisters) bring their twist on the spy loves spy story of Mr. and Mrs. Smith to the small screen with plenty of sexy, international, espionage action. Retired CIA operatives Steven and Samantha Bloom (Boris Kodjoe and Gugu Mbatha-Raw) are drawn back into the game when their colleague and close friend, Leo Nash (Carter MacIntyre), goes missing. With Abrams' name on the project, it's sure to be flashy and fun.



Blue Bloods
Blue Bloods
Debuts Sept. 24, 2010 on CBS
New York Police Commissioner Frank Reagan (Tom Selleck) manages the politics and dramas of a multigenerational law enforcement clan. On the enforcement end are officer sons the tough Iraq War vet Danny (Donny Wahlberg) and ambitious Harvard man Jamie (Will Estes). On the law end is assistant district attorney daughter Erin (Bridget Moynahan), also a single-mom. A police procedural with topnotch acting cred, it is already garnering good advance word from critics.

Also new: Nikita (Sept. 9, CW); The Event (Sept. 20, NBC); Detroit 1-8-7 (Sept. 21, ABC); Law & Order: Los Angeles (Sept. 22, CBS); The Whole Truth (Sept. 22, ABC) The DefendersOutlaw (Sept. 22, CBS); (Sept. 24, NBC); Body of Proof (TBD, ABC)

Plus returning old favorites: Castle (Sept. 20, ABC); House (Sept. 20, FOX); Bones (Sept. 20, FOX); Chuck (Sept. 20, NBC); CSI: NY (Sept 21, CBS); NCIS (Sept. 21, CBS); NCIS: Los Angeles (Sept. 21, CBS); Criminal Minds (Sept. 22, CBS); Law & Order: SVU (Sept. 22, NBC); CSI (Sept. 23, CBS); The Mentalist (Sept. 23, CBS); Bored to Death (Sept. 26, HBO); Dexter (Sept. 26, Showtime); CSI: Miami (Oct. 3, CBS).

Teri Duerr
2010-09-16 15:35:28

scorsese_boardwalkempireBuzz on the best of the new fall 2010 lineup.

The Lawyers Behind the Defenders
Oline Cogdill
Most people whose lives become fodder for television shows end up on the myriad of reality shows. But Las Vegas attorneys Michael Cristalli and Marc Saggese aren’t survivors, unless you consider their jobs a matter of surviving the legal system. And they certainly aren’t any real housewives, though they see plenty of drama in their work.

Cristalli and Saggese are the real Defenders whose courtroom exploits are the inspiration for the new CBS drama that debuts at 10 p.m. EST/9 p.m. CST on Wednesday, September 22. The Defenders will star Jim Belushi as Nick Morelli and Jerry O’Connell as Pete Kaczmarek as leaders of the Las Vegas law firm Morelli & Kaczmarek, which has a reputation of taking on the toughest, most difficult to defend clients.

Jim Belushi’s role as Nick Morelli is the onscreen version of Marc Saggese while Jerry O’Connell’s Pete Kaczmarek is the renamed Michael Cristalli.

Cristalli and Saggese’s partnership – and friendship – seems predestined. Their mothers grew up across the street from one another in a tightly knit upstate New York Italian community. Michael’s grandfather and Marc’s great-grandfather were close friends. In fact, look for a picture of the two men taken in 1931 that will be on the Nick
Morelli’s office wall in the pilot. Although Cristalli and Saggese grew up near each other, they never met until they were newly minted attorneys just starting out.

Cristalli and Saggese moved from Utica, N.Y., to Las Vegas in 1995 to launch his legal career as an intern before joining a firm. In 1999, Saggese left Utica for Las Vegas to launch his career. They quickly became friends, united by their background and became law partners four years after they met.

The two lawyers became known as taking on high-profile cases, including the murder trail for Sandy Murphy, accused with her lover, of murdering her former boyfriend Ted Binion, a member of the family-owned Binion's Horseshoe in downtown Las Vegas. The also defended bodybuilder Craig Titus and his wife Kelly Ryan who were charged with the 2005 murder of their personal assistant, Melissa James.

Both cases generated national headlines and the two attorneys appeared on Larry King, 48 Hours, Court TV, CNN and Good Morning America. Producers Joe and Harry Gantz decided Cristalli and Saggese were fodder for a docudrama, which became the basis for the CBS series.
title

Somehow, Cristalli and Saggese managed to squeeze in between court dates answers to Mystery Scene’s questions about the show.

Here’s part one of that interview. Look for part two in a couple of weeks.
Q: Did you ever think your lives would be fodder for a TV show?
Marc: This show kind of found us — never thought in my wildest dreams that what I do professionally and personally would be featured in such a way. I never thought in a million years that a show would stumble into our office.
Michael: Certainly, this has been a surreal experience; we’ve never thought our lives would be the basis of a CBS drama! However, through The Defenders, we are fortunate to be able to project our message -- a view of the justice system through the lives of the defendant and the defense lawyer. To highlight the injustices of the justice system and how these two lawyers fight to protect the interest of their clients -- this is what law always meant to us, and its great to have a TV show as a platform.
Q: What’s it like to have your lives turned into a TV series? Are the characters’ personality quirks, private lives on the series as you are in real life?
Marc:
The Defenders is very accurate personality wise. Jim and Jerry have us down to a tee. Our personality and interaction with each other are very real.
Michael: The Defenders takes certain dramatic liberties. Marc and I are both married. However, Pete is single and a ladies man, and Nick is on the outs with his own wife…but this represents the majority of dramatic liberties the show takes with our lives. Otherwise, it has been consistent with the theme of the documentary.
Q: TV is filled with strong series about the law, both now and in the past – The Good Wife, Law & Order, etc. How is your show different?
Marc:
Our show is different because it is real. It’s based on real cases – we check in daily on the show’s legal accuracy. We make sure that this show is unique in virtue of its basis in reality. I don’t know of any other show that is so honest in its portrayal of what defense attorneys experience each day. It’s the one show that shines a light on
what it is to be a defense council.
Michael: Our show is a break away from that type of legal drama. Most of these are black and white – they are about the police and the prosecution getting the bad guy. There’s never a real development of the defendant in most courtroom shows. In real life, the law is grey. The defender’s develop the character of these two lawyers and
highlights the plight of a defendant facing overwhelming charges by the State. It is about the personal lives of these two lawyers and how they work to overcome those challenges.
Q: The previews show The Defenders with a streak of humor in it; will this be in the series?
Marc:
This show is real life – what I really love about it is its sense of humor. Humor is essential. We have a sense of humor in order not to take ourselves too seriously and in an effort to cope. When you walk into a courtroom and you have a defendant looking at you, and his wife is in the front and his children are in the hallway crying, you know
the stakes are high. Imagine carrying a weight like that on your back everyday. Without having a sense of humor, you would crumble under that pressure.
Michael: Definitely a drama that has comedic value – but that’s truer to life.

Q: Are you pleased with the way Jim Belushi and Jerry O’Connell portray you?
Marc:
They are both a lot funnier than I will ever be. Their depiction of how we care. There’s a scene in the first show where Jim is giving his closing argument. He puts his elbows on the rail and speaks to the jury, saying “what would you do?” You can tell in his face as an actor that he’s portraying someone who is involved emotionally and morally with the case. So much of what it means to be a good defense attorney is captured in the series.
Michael: Obviously, there’s dramatic liberties that enhance or magnify our lives to make it more fun or comedic. In reality, they definitely capture our essence – our care for the client, our care for the cause. They’ve done a tremendous job of portraying the realities, while keeping it entertaining.
Photo: Marc Saggese, Jim Belushi, Michael Cristalli, Jerry O’Connell. CBS photo
Xav ID 577
2010-09-19 20:10:07
Most people whose lives become fodder for television shows end up on the myriad of reality shows. But Las Vegas attorneys Michael Cristalli and Marc Saggese aren’t survivors, unless you consider their jobs a matter of surviving the legal system. And they certainly aren’t any real housewives, though they see plenty of drama in their work.

Cristalli and Saggese are the real Defenders whose courtroom exploits are the inspiration for the new CBS drama that debuts at 10 p.m. EST/9 p.m. CST on Wednesday, September 22. The Defenders will star Jim Belushi as Nick Morelli and Jerry O’Connell as Pete Kaczmarek as leaders of the Las Vegas law firm Morelli & Kaczmarek, which has a reputation of taking on the toughest, most difficult to defend clients.

Jim Belushi’s role as Nick Morelli is the onscreen version of Marc Saggese while Jerry O’Connell’s Pete Kaczmarek is the renamed Michael Cristalli.

Cristalli and Saggese’s partnership – and friendship – seems predestined. Their mothers grew up across the street from one another in a tightly knit upstate New York Italian community. Michael’s grandfather and Marc’s great-grandfather were close friends. In fact, look for a picture of the two men taken in 1931 that will be on the Nick
Morelli’s office wall in the pilot. Although Cristalli and Saggese grew up near each other, they never met until they were newly minted attorneys just starting out.

Cristalli and Saggese moved from Utica, N.Y., to Las Vegas in 1995 to launch his legal career as an intern before joining a firm. In 1999, Saggese left Utica for Las Vegas to launch his career. They quickly became friends, united by their background and became law partners four years after they met.

The two lawyers became known as taking on high-profile cases, including the murder trail for Sandy Murphy, accused with her lover, of murdering her former boyfriend Ted Binion, a member of the family-owned Binion's Horseshoe in downtown Las Vegas. The also defended bodybuilder Craig Titus and his wife Kelly Ryan who were charged with the 2005 murder of their personal assistant, Melissa James.

Both cases generated national headlines and the two attorneys appeared on Larry King, 48 Hours, Court TV, CNN and Good Morning America. Producers Joe and Harry Gantz decided Cristalli and Saggese were fodder for a docudrama, which became the basis for the CBS series.
title

Somehow, Cristalli and Saggese managed to squeeze in between court dates answers to Mystery Scene’s questions about the show.

Here’s part one of that interview. Look for part two in a couple of weeks.
Q: Did you ever think your lives would be fodder for a TV show?
Marc: This show kind of found us — never thought in my wildest dreams that what I do professionally and personally would be featured in such a way. I never thought in a million years that a show would stumble into our office.
Michael: Certainly, this has been a surreal experience; we’ve never thought our lives would be the basis of a CBS drama! However, through The Defenders, we are fortunate to be able to project our message -- a view of the justice system through the lives of the defendant and the defense lawyer. To highlight the injustices of the justice system and how these two lawyers fight to protect the interest of their clients -- this is what law always meant to us, and its great to have a TV show as a platform.
Q: What’s it like to have your lives turned into a TV series? Are the characters’ personality quirks, private lives on the series as you are in real life?
Marc:
The Defenders is very accurate personality wise. Jim and Jerry have us down to a tee. Our personality and interaction with each other are very real.
Michael: The Defenders takes certain dramatic liberties. Marc and I are both married. However, Pete is single and a ladies man, and Nick is on the outs with his own wife…but this represents the majority of dramatic liberties the show takes with our lives. Otherwise, it has been consistent with the theme of the documentary.
Q: TV is filled with strong series about the law, both now and in the past – The Good Wife, Law & Order, etc. How is your show different?
Marc:
Our show is different because it is real. It’s based on real cases – we check in daily on the show’s legal accuracy. We make sure that this show is unique in virtue of its basis in reality. I don’t know of any other show that is so honest in its portrayal of what defense attorneys experience each day. It’s the one show that shines a light on
what it is to be a defense council.
Michael: Our show is a break away from that type of legal drama. Most of these are black and white – they are about the police and the prosecution getting the bad guy. There’s never a real development of the defendant in most courtroom shows. In real life, the law is grey. The defender’s develop the character of these two lawyers and
highlights the plight of a defendant facing overwhelming charges by the State. It is about the personal lives of these two lawyers and how they work to overcome those challenges.
Q: The previews show The Defenders with a streak of humor in it; will this be in the series?
Marc:
This show is real life – what I really love about it is its sense of humor. Humor is essential. We have a sense of humor in order not to take ourselves too seriously and in an effort to cope. When you walk into a courtroom and you have a defendant looking at you, and his wife is in the front and his children are in the hallway crying, you know
the stakes are high. Imagine carrying a weight like that on your back everyday. Without having a sense of humor, you would crumble under that pressure.
Michael: Definitely a drama that has comedic value – but that’s truer to life.

Q: Are you pleased with the way Jim Belushi and Jerry O’Connell portray you?
Marc:
They are both a lot funnier than I will ever be. Their depiction of how we care. There’s a scene in the first show where Jim is giving his closing argument. He puts his elbows on the rail and speaks to the jury, saying “what would you do?” You can tell in his face as an actor that he’s portraying someone who is involved emotionally and morally with the case. So much of what it means to be a good defense attorney is captured in the series.
Michael: Obviously, there’s dramatic liberties that enhance or magnify our lives to make it more fun or comedic. In reality, they definitely capture our essence – our care for the client, our care for the cause. They’ve done a tremendous job of portraying the realities, while keeping it entertaining.
Photo: Marc Saggese, Jim Belushi, Michael Cristalli, Jerry O’Connell. CBS photo
Fall 2010, Issue #116 Contents
Mystery Scene

116cover_250

Features

Kathy Reichs: Bones and Beyond

Her bestselling novels about a forensic anthropologist, Temperance Brennan, and the hit TV series they inspired are only the beginning for this powerhouse.
by Oline H. Cogdill

William Kent Krueger

Long known as a “writer’s writer,” the word is spreading about this author’s richly characterized, densely plotted,and emotionally resonant novels.
by Lynn Kaczmarek

Murder on the Menu

There’s nothing more delicious than crime writers cooking up trouble—and writing down recipes.
by Kevin Burton Smith

Lester Dent: The Man Behind Doc Savage

As the creator of an iconic hero, Lester Dent was hugely successful, prolific, influential—and virtually unknown.
by Michael Mallory

The Write Stuff: Authors in Crime

The literary life is thrilling, dangerous, even deadly—well, at least it is in these films.
by Art Taylor

Sherlock Holmes' Smarter Sister

There’s a strong case to be made that Enola is the best detective in the Holmes family.
by Cheryl Solimini

The Murders in Memory Lane: Charles Willeford

A writer as idiosyncratic as his characters.
by Lawrence Block

What's Happening...With C.C. Benison

by Brian Skupin

Departments

At the Scene

by Kate Stine

Hints & Allegations

Writers on Reading: Deon Meyer. 2010 Thriller Awards, 2010 David Award, 2010 Ned Kelly Awards, The New Hawaii 5-0.

Our Readers Recommend

by Mystery Scene readers

Writing Life: Gormania

Forgotten Books; Nancy Pickard; Frenzy; Perry Mason.
by Ed Gorman

New Books Essays

Bowling for Rhinos
by Betty Webb

Back Home
by Michael W. Sherer

Dateline: Hemingway
by Diane Gilbert Madsen

Boston, Inside Out
by Rosemary Herbert

Crime Scene Crazy
by L.J. Sellers

Sounds of Suspense: Audiobooks Reviewed

by Dick Lochte

Child's Play: Books for Young Sleuths

by Roberta Rogow

Short & Sweet: Short Stories Considered

by Bill Crider

Small Press Reviews: Covering the Independents

by Betty Webb

Very Original: Paperback Originals Reviewed

by Lynne Maxwell

What About Murder? Reference Books Reviewed

by Jon L. Breen

Mystery Scene Reviews

Miscellaneous

The Docket

Letters

Mystery Miscellany
by Louis Phillips

Advertiser Index

Advertising Info

Admin
2010-04-06 02:39:02

116cover_250

Features

Kathy Reichs: Bones and Beyond

Her bestselling novels about a forensic anthropologist, Temperance Brennan, and the hit TV series they inspired are only the beginning for this powerhouse.
by Oline H. Cogdill

William Kent Krueger

Long known as a “writer’s writer,” the word is spreading about this author’s richly characterized, densely plotted,and emotionally resonant novels.
by Lynn Kaczmarek

Murder on the Menu

There’s nothing more delicious than crime writers cooking up trouble—and writing down recipes.
by Kevin Burton Smith

Lester Dent: The Man Behind Doc Savage

As the creator of an iconic hero, Lester Dent was hugely successful, prolific, influential—and virtually unknown.
by Michael Mallory

The Write Stuff: Authors in Crime

The literary life is thrilling, dangerous, even deadly—well, at least it is in these films.
by Art Taylor

Sherlock Holmes' Smarter Sister

There’s a strong case to be made that Enola is the best detective in the Holmes family.
by Cheryl Solimini

The Murders in Memory Lane: Charles Willeford

A writer as idiosyncratic as his characters.
by Lawrence Block

What's Happening...With C.C. Benison

by Brian Skupin

Departments

At the Scene

by Kate Stine

Hints & Allegations

Writers on Reading: Deon Meyer. 2010 Thriller Awards, 2010 David Award, 2010 Ned Kelly Awards, The New Hawaii 5-0.

Our Readers Recommend

by Mystery Scene readers

Writing Life: Gormania

Forgotten Books; Nancy Pickard; Frenzy; Perry Mason.
by Ed Gorman

New Books Essays

Bowling for Rhinos
by Betty Webb

Back Home
by Michael W. Sherer

Dateline: Hemingway
by Diane Gilbert Madsen

Boston, Inside Out
by Rosemary Herbert

Crime Scene Crazy
by L.J. Sellers

Sounds of Suspense: Audiobooks Reviewed

by Dick Lochte

Child's Play: Books for Young Sleuths

by Roberta Rogow

Short & Sweet: Short Stories Considered

by Bill Crider

Small Press Reviews: Covering the Independents

by Betty Webb

Very Original: Paperback Originals Reviewed

by Lynne Maxwell

What About Murder? Reference Books Reviewed

by Jon L. Breen

Mystery Scene Reviews

Miscellaneous

The Docket

Letters

Mystery Miscellany
by Louis Phillips

Advertiser Index

Advertising Info

At the Scene, Fall Issue #116
Kate Stine

116cover_250

Hi everyone!

It’s not unusual to come across improbably accomplished heroes in mystery novels. You know, the internationally renowned expert with a 15-page resume, an active social life, and a wildly successful sideline in the arts. What is unusual is to find an author who not only matches but far exceeds the talents of her creation.

Readers, meet Kathy Reichs.

Reichs is not only a forensic anthropologist with sterling academic credentials, her consulting work has taken her to many of the most tragic scenes of recent history—the genocides in Guatemala and Rwanda, the World Trade Center site in New York. Oh, and in her spare time, Reichs writes bestselling novels which have inspired a hit TV show for which she also consults...whew! Reichs is definitely a force of nature and we’re delighted she could spare the time to talk with Oline Cogdill for Mystery Scene.

Nancy Springer’s Enola Holmes mysteries are a treat, offering many pleasures to readers both young and old—not the least of which is a well-deserved comeuppance to the Great Detective himself. As Enola’s creator notes, misogyny is the not-so-buried subtext, in the Sherlock Holmes stories and I found it quite satisfying as a female reader to see it trip up Enola’s older brother.

Also in this issue, Lynn Kaczmarek catches up with one of her favorite writers, William Kent Krueger, and Michael Mallory discusses the career of Lester Dent, a little-known author with a very big legacy.

Art Taylor looks at writers as characters in the movies, and Kevin Burton Smith examines writers as chefs in his survey of mystery cookbooks.

This is the last “Child’s Play” column from Roberta Rogow, who is leaving us to focus on her own novels. Thanks, Roberta!

Your Suggestions

Recently we asked for your input on the future of Mystery Scene, and excerpts from some of the many responses are reprinted in the “Letters” section. We appreciate your thoughtful comments, creative ideas, and the many kind wishes.

Here are some summary results: On balance, most of you preferred print as opposed to a PDF or e-reader format.

The overwhelming consensus was in favor of book-related content, including as many reviews as possible. I particularly appreciated the many thoughtful suggestions on editorial coverage and you’ll be seeing the results in future issues.

Unsurprisingly, no one wanted higher subscription rates. We agree, although do please note that prices are the same now as they were before we took over the magazine in 2002. So far, we’ve been able to fund improvements with advertising revenue and our growing number of readers.

Following that line of thought, you’ll notice that every page in this issue is printed in color—a big step forward and one we think will attract new readers while improving our coverage of crime fiction in all its myriad variations. And as a bonus, it’s a lot of fun!

We hope you enjoy this issue and, as always, we’ll be interested in your input.

Kate Stine
Editor-in-chief

Teri Duerr
2010-04-25 16:42:27

Read Kate's Fall #116 "At the Scene"

Spenser, Mortal Stakes
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:19:26

“When in doubt, cook something and eat it.”

— Spenser, Mortal Stakes, 1975, by Robert Parker

Jim O’boyle, 52 Pick-Up
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:23:31

“No one ever got in trouble keeping his mouth shut.”

— Jim O’Boyle, 52 Pick-up, 1974, Elmore Leonard

“Macavity: the Mystery Cat,“ Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:25:17

“He always has an alibi and one or two to spare.”

— “Macavity: The Mystery Cat,“ Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats, 1939, T.S. Eliot

Mrs. Crandall, the Underground Man
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:28:49
“We gave her everything. But it wasn’t what she wanted.”

— Mrs. Crandall, The Underground Man, 1971, by Ross Macdonald
Travis Mcgee, Cinnamon Skin
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:33:37
“There are no hundred percent heroes.”
— Travis McGee, Cinnamon Skin, 1982, by John D. MacDonald
James Cagney (1899-1986), Newsweek
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:37:17
Where I come from, if there's a buck to be made, you don't ask questions, you go ahead and make it.

—James Cagney (1899-1986), Newsweek, 1973
Colin Lamb, the Clocks
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:38:36
Don’t worry. Surely the most fatuous words in the English or any other language.

—Colin Lamb, The Clocks, 1963, by Agatha Christie
Arnold Schwarzenegger, Playboy
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:40:03
"I have a love interest in every one of my films—a gun."

—Arnold Schwarzenegger, Playboy, 1988
Amelia Peabody Emerson, the Hippopotamus Pool
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:41:38
"Emerson was clearly in one of his masterful moods. I always allow him to enjoy them unless I feel it is necessary to set him straight."

—Amelia Peabody Emerson, The Hippopotamus Pool, 1996, by Elizabeth Peters
Roger Moore, Screen International
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:42:40
"My pictures always seem to be filmed in places that I can't pronounce."

—Roger Moore, Screen International, 1980
Anthony Perkins, Photoplay
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:43:44
"Norman Bates is the Hamlet of horror roles. Not your standard guy."

—Anthony Perkins, Photoplay, 1986
Vic Daniel Describing His Friend Benny, Down in the Valley
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:44:41
"He came into the room with the calm ruddy-cheeked innocence of the truly amoral."

—Vic Daniel describing his friend Benny, Down in the Valley, 1989, by David M. Pierce
Monsignor Ronald Knox
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:46:08
"This world may be divided into those who take it or leave it and those who split the difference."
—Monsignor Ronald Knox (1888-1957), British clergyman and mystery writer
William Shakespeare, the Winter's Tale
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:47:10
"Though I am not naturally honest, I am so sometimes by chance."

—William Shakespeare, The Winter's Tale, 1611
Samuel Butler
Teri Duerr
2010-09-20 21:48:41
"There are more fools than knaves in the world, else the knaves would not have enough to live upon."

—Samuel Butler (1835-1902)