Books

by Megan Abbott
Simon & Schuster, January 2007, $

When a beautiful young woman asks Cinestar PR agent Gil Hopkins about a sexy starlet who disappeared two years ago, Gil's paranoia and guilt switch into overdrive. He thought he had successfully covered up that mess. Had he forgotten something? He couldn't be blamed for anything, could he? But some secrets won't stay hidden.

This homage to noir vividly recreates the Hollywood of the late 1940s and early '50s when PR agents covered up all kinds of peccadilloes for their stars and starlets. Casual sex, drug and alcohol abuse were widespread. In fact, the disappearance of gorgeous Jean Spangler bothered no one. It happened a lot. Cynical cops and wisecracking reporters forgot it in a day.

The book's major characters Gil, Jean and her friend Iolene are colorful. Gil is sardonic, flippant and ambitious. The dames are beautiful and tough, and not very trustworthy. They take their cues from classic noir and PI characters well. Even the language uses pulp prose. As Gil tries to find out what really happened to Jean, he realizes that everyone has been keeping secrets from him. Could it be this capable can-do rep has really been played for a patsy? Recommended for lovers of pulp noir.

Beverly J. DeWeese

When a beautiful young woman asks Cinestar PR agent Gil Hopkins about a sexy starlet who disappeared two years ago, Gil's paranoia and guilt switch into overdrive. He thought he had successfully covered up that mess. Had he forgotten something? He couldn't be blamed for anything, could he? But some secrets won't stay hidden.

This homage to noir vividly recreates the Hollywood of the late 1940s and early '50s when PR agents covered up all kinds of peccadilloes for their stars and starlets. Casual sex, drug and alcohol abuse were widespread. In fact, the disappearance of gorgeous Jean Spangler bothered no one. It happened a lot. Cynical cops and wisecracking reporters forgot it in a day.

The book's major characters Gil, Jean and her friend Iolene are colorful. Gil is sardonic, flippant and ambitious. The dames are beautiful and tough, and not very trustworthy. They take their cues from classic noir and PI characters well. Even the language uses pulp prose. As Gil tries to find out what really happened to Jean, he realizes that everyone has been keeping secrets from him. Could it be this capable can-do rep has really been played for a patsy? Recommended for lovers of pulp noir.

Xav ID 1
741

by Megan Abbott
Simon & Schuster, January 2007, $

Abbott
January 2007
the-song-is-you
Simon & Schuster