Short Stories

by Sarah Weinman, ed.
Penguin Books, August 2013, $16.00

Troubled Daughters, Twisted Wives: Stories from the Trailblazers of Domestic Suspense is an important anthology. Editor Sarah Weinman has gathered 16 stories by “an entire generation of female crime writers who have faded from view,” as she says in her introduction. The stories span the time from the early 1940s to the middle 1970s, and in her excellent introductions to the volume and to each story, Weinman’s goal is to give readers an understanding of “the time and place in which these women created some of the best and most influential crime fiction ever written” and to bring proper recognition to the branch of crime fiction known as “domestic suspense.” Readers of a certain age (mine) will likely find the names of all the authors familiar, but others might not. Among them are Nedra Tyre, Shirley Jackson, Patricia Highsmith, Miriam Allen deFord, and Margaret Millar. In deFord’s story there’s a dying man who just won’t die and a nurse who wants the money in his wall safe. So, she decides to kill him. It’s a twisted tale with an ending you won’t see coming. Jackson’s “Louisa, Please Come Home” is about a runaway and a change of identity. We are who we pretend to be. All these stories are top-notch.

Bill Crider

Troubled Daughters, Twisted Wives: Stories from the Trailblazers of Domestic Suspense is an important anthology. Editor Sarah Weinman has gathered 16 stories by “an entire generation of female crime writers who have faded from view,” as she says in her introduction. The stories span the time from the early 1940s to the middle 1970s, and in her excellent introductions to the volume and to each story, Weinman’s goal is to give readers an understanding of “the time and place in which these women created some of the best and most influential crime fiction ever written” and to bring proper recognition to the branch of crime fiction known as “domestic suspense.” Readers of a certain age (mine) will likely find the names of all the authors familiar, but others might not. Among them are Nedra Tyre, Shirley Jackson, Patricia Highsmith, Miriam Allen deFord, and Margaret Millar. In deFord’s story there’s a dying man who just won’t die and a nurse who wants the money in his wall safe. So, she decides to kill him. It’s a twisted tale with an ending you won’t see coming. Jackson’s “Louisa, Please Come Home” is about a runaway and a change of identity. We are who we pretend to be. All these stories are top-notch.

Teri Duerr
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by Sarah Weinman, ed.
Penguin Books, August 2013, $16.00

Weinman, ed.
August 2013
troubled-daughters-twisted-wives-stories-from-the-trailblazers-of-domestic-suspense
16.00
Penguin Books