Friday, 29 April 2011 05:34

Mystery Writers of America announced the winners of the 2011 Edgar Allan Poe Awards, honoring the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction and television published or produced in 2010, during the 65th Gala Banquet, April 28, 2011 at the Grand Hyatt Hotel, New York City.

BEST NOVEL

The Lock Artist by Steve Hamilton (Minotaur Books)


BEST FIRST NOVEL BY AN AMERICAN AUTHOR

Rogue Island by Bruce DeSilva (Tom Doherty Associates – Forge Books)


BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL

Long Time Coming by Robert Goddard (Random House - Bantam)


BEST FACT CRIME

Scoreboard, Baby: A Story of College Football, Crime and Complicity
by Ken Armstrong and Nick Perry (University of Nebraska Press – Bison Original)


BEST CRITICAL/BIOGRAPHICAL

Charlie Chan: The Untold Story of the Honorable Detective and his
Rendezvouz with American History
by Yunte Huang (W.W. Norton)


BEST SHORT STORY

"The Scent of Lilacs" – Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine by Doug Allyn (Dell Magazines)


BEST JUVENILE

The Buddy Files: The Case of the Lost Boy by Dori Hillestad Butler (Albert Whitman & Co.)


BEST YOUNG ADULT

Interrogation of Gabriel James by Charlie Price (Farrar, Straus, Giroux Books for Young Readers)


BEST PLAY

The Psychic by Sam Bobrick (Falcon Theatre – Burbank, CA)


BEST TELEVISION EPISODE TELEPLAY

“Episode 1” - Luther, Teleplay by Neil Cross (BBC America)


ROBERT L. FISH MEMORIAL AWARD

"Skyler Hobbs and the Rabbit Man" – Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine
by Evan Lewis (Dell Magazines)


GRAND MASTER

Sara Paretsky


RAVEN AWARDS

Centuries & Sleuths Bookstore, Forest Park, Illinois
Once Upon A Crime Bookstore, Minneapolis, Minnesota


THE SIMON & SCHUSTER - MARY HIGGINS CLARK AWARD
(Presented at MWA’s Agents & Editors Party on Wednesday, April 27, 2011)

The Crossing Places by Elly Griffiths (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

Edgar Winners for 2010
Oline Cogdill
edgar-winners

Mystery Writers of America announced the winners of the 2011 Edgar Allan Poe Awards, honoring the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction and television published or produced in 2010, during the 65th Gala Banquet, April 28, 2011 at the Grand Hyatt Hotel, New York City.

BEST NOVEL

The Lock Artist by Steve Hamilton (Minotaur Books)


BEST FIRST NOVEL BY AN AMERICAN AUTHOR

Rogue Island by Bruce DeSilva (Tom Doherty Associates – Forge Books)


BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL

Long Time Coming by Robert Goddard (Random House - Bantam)


BEST FACT CRIME

Scoreboard, Baby: A Story of College Football, Crime and Complicity
by Ken Armstrong and Nick Perry (University of Nebraska Press – Bison Original)


BEST CRITICAL/BIOGRAPHICAL

Charlie Chan: The Untold Story of the Honorable Detective and his
Rendezvouz with American History
by Yunte Huang (W.W. Norton)


BEST SHORT STORY

"The Scent of Lilacs" – Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine by Doug Allyn (Dell Magazines)


BEST JUVENILE

The Buddy Files: The Case of the Lost Boy by Dori Hillestad Butler (Albert Whitman & Co.)


BEST YOUNG ADULT

Interrogation of Gabriel James by Charlie Price (Farrar, Straus, Giroux Books for Young Readers)


BEST PLAY

The Psychic by Sam Bobrick (Falcon Theatre – Burbank, CA)


BEST TELEVISION EPISODE TELEPLAY

“Episode 1” - Luther, Teleplay by Neil Cross (BBC America)


ROBERT L. FISH MEMORIAL AWARD

"Skyler Hobbs and the Rabbit Man" – Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine
by Evan Lewis (Dell Magazines)


GRAND MASTER

Sara Paretsky


RAVEN AWARDS

Centuries & Sleuths Bookstore, Forest Park, Illinois
Once Upon A Crime Bookstore, Minneapolis, Minnesota


THE SIMON & SCHUSTER - MARY HIGGINS CLARK AWARD
(Presented at MWA’s Agents & Editors Party on Wednesday, April 27, 2011)

The Crossing Places by Elly Griffiths (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

Thursday, 28 April 2011 21:06

The 2011 Arthur Ellis Award Nominees Announced

(Toronto, ON) April 29, 2011 – Crime Writers of Canada (CWC) have announced the nominees for the 28th annual Arthur Ellis Awards, Canada’s premier awards for excellence in crime writing. The 2011 awards are for books and short stories published in 2010. Crime Writers celebrate all facets of the genre, including crime, detective, espionage, mystery, suspense, and thriller, and include fictional or factual accounts of criminal doings and literary works with a criminal theme.

BEST NOVEL
C. B. Forrest, Slow Recoil (RendezVous Crime)
Mike Knowles, In Plain Sight (ECW Press)
Jeffrey Moore, The Extinction Club (Penguin Group)
Louise Penny, Bury Your Dead (Little, Brown UK) -
Michael Van Rooy, A Criminal to Remember (Turnstone Press)

BEST SHORT STORY
Mary Jane Maffini, “So Much in Common” in Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine
Jas R. Petrin, “In it Up to My Neck” in Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine
Jordan McPeek, “The Big Touch” in Thuglit
James Powell, “The Piper's Door” in Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine
William Deverall, “The Bust” in Whodunit: Sun Media’s Canadian Crime Fiction Showcase

BEST NON-FICTION
Stevie Cameron, On the Farm (Knopf Canada)
Robert Wright, Our Man in Tehran (HarperCollins)
Roy MacGregor, Northern Light: The Enduring Mystery of Tom Thomson and the Woman Who Loved Him (Random House)

BEST JUVENILE/YOUNG ADULT
Allan Stratton, Borderline (HarperCollins)
Alice Kuipers, The Worst Thing She Ever Did (HarperCollins)
Sharee Fitch, Pluto’s Ghost (Doubleday Canada)
Norah McClintock, Victim Rights (Red Deer Press)
Yvonne Prinz, The Vinyl Princess (HarperCollins)

BEST CRIME WRITING IN FRENCH
Jacques Savoie, Cinq secondes (Libre Expression)
Jacques Côté, Dans le quartier des agités (Alire)
Johanne Seymour, Vanités (Libre Expression)
Michel Châteauneuf, La société des pères meurtriers (Vents D'ouest)
Bernard Gilbert, Quand la mort s'invite à la première (Québec Amérique)

BEST FIRST NOVEL
Hilary Davidson, The Damage Done (Tom Doherty Associates)
Avner Mandleman, The Debba (Other Press)
Michael McKinley, The Penalty Killing (McClelland & Stewart)
Nicholas Ruddock, The Parabolist (Doubleday)
Chevy Stevens, Still Missing (St. Martin's Press)

UNHANGED ARTHUR (Best Unpublished First Crime Novel)
John Jeneroux, Better Off Dead
Kevin Thornton, Uncoiled
Jayne Barnard, When the Bow Breaks

All the award winners will be announced at the Arthur Ellis Awards Banquet in Victoria, B.C., on June 2, 2011, in the Pender Island Ballroom at the Grand Pacific Hotel.

For additional information please contact:
Melodie Campbell
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

For additional information on Crime Writers of Canada and the Arthur Ellis Awards:
www.crimewriterscanada.com

The 2011 Arthur Ellis Award Nominees Announced
Mystery Scene
the-2011-arthur-ellis-award-nominees-announced

The 2011 Arthur Ellis Award Nominees Announced

(Toronto, ON) April 29, 2011 – Crime Writers of Canada (CWC) have announced the nominees for the 28th annual Arthur Ellis Awards, Canada’s premier awards for excellence in crime writing. The 2011 awards are for books and short stories published in 2010. Crime Writers celebrate all facets of the genre, including crime, detective, espionage, mystery, suspense, and thriller, and include fictional or factual accounts of criminal doings and literary works with a criminal theme.

BEST NOVEL
C. B. Forrest, Slow Recoil (RendezVous Crime)
Mike Knowles, In Plain Sight (ECW Press)
Jeffrey Moore, The Extinction Club (Penguin Group)
Louise Penny, Bury Your Dead (Little, Brown UK) -
Michael Van Rooy, A Criminal to Remember (Turnstone Press)

BEST SHORT STORY
Mary Jane Maffini, “So Much in Common” in Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine
Jas R. Petrin, “In it Up to My Neck” in Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine
Jordan McPeek, “The Big Touch” in Thuglit
James Powell, “The Piper's Door” in Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine
William Deverall, “The Bust” in Whodunit: Sun Media’s Canadian Crime Fiction Showcase

BEST NON-FICTION
Stevie Cameron, On the Farm (Knopf Canada)
Robert Wright, Our Man in Tehran (HarperCollins)
Roy MacGregor, Northern Light: The Enduring Mystery of Tom Thomson and the Woman Who Loved Him (Random House)

BEST JUVENILE/YOUNG ADULT
Allan Stratton, Borderline (HarperCollins)
Alice Kuipers, The Worst Thing She Ever Did (HarperCollins)
Sharee Fitch, Pluto’s Ghost (Doubleday Canada)
Norah McClintock, Victim Rights (Red Deer Press)
Yvonne Prinz, The Vinyl Princess (HarperCollins)

BEST CRIME WRITING IN FRENCH
Jacques Savoie, Cinq secondes (Libre Expression)
Jacques Côté, Dans le quartier des agités (Alire)
Johanne Seymour, Vanités (Libre Expression)
Michel Châteauneuf, La société des pères meurtriers (Vents D'ouest)
Bernard Gilbert, Quand la mort s'invite à la première (Québec Amérique)

BEST FIRST NOVEL
Hilary Davidson, The Damage Done (Tom Doherty Associates)
Avner Mandleman, The Debba (Other Press)
Michael McKinley, The Penalty Killing (McClelland & Stewart)
Nicholas Ruddock, The Parabolist (Doubleday)
Chevy Stevens, Still Missing (St. Martin's Press)

UNHANGED ARTHUR (Best Unpublished First Crime Novel)
John Jeneroux, Better Off Dead
Kevin Thornton, Uncoiled
Jayne Barnard, When the Bow Breaks

All the award winners will be announced at the Arthur Ellis Awards Banquet in Victoria, B.C., on June 2, 2011, in the Pender Island Ballroom at the Grand Pacific Hotel.

For additional information please contact:
Melodie Campbell
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

For additional information on Crime Writers of Canada and the Arthur Ellis Awards:
www.crimewriterscanada.com

Tuesday, 26 April 2011 20:59

titleThis is a big week for mystery fiction lovers.

The Edgar Symposium begins Wednesday, April 27, at the Lighthouse International in New York City. Many top-notch authors and publishers will be there discussing the genre and its future. I'll be conducting the interview with Grand Master Sara Paretsky.

The 65th annual Edgar Awards banquet will be Thursday, April 28, at the Grand Hyatt in New York City. All the nominees are worthy.

And on Friday, April 29, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize will be awarded. I am delighted to say I was one of the judges for the mystery-thriller category.

Again, all the nominees are worthy.

And this also is the week that Malice Domestic begins on Friday, April 29, through May 1 at the Hyatt Regency in Bethesda, MD. This year, Sue Grafton will receive the Lifetime Achievement; Donna Andrews, at left, is the Toastmaster and Carole Nelson Douglas is the Guest of Honor.

This is the 23rd year for Malice, which celebrates the traditional mystery.

And I'd like to celebrate the traditional mystery.

In general, I believe that mystery fiction mirrors our society. These are novels that refect who we are, the struggles we have and how we deal with crime and punishment.

The traditional mystery especially does this. These novels often are about relationships and family issues. The best evidence of this are the nominees for the Agatha Awards. (Again, all the nominees are worthy.)

Take a look at those up for Best Novel: Stork Raving Mad by Donna Andrews (Minotaur); Bury Your Dead by Louise Penny (Minotaur); The Scent of Rain and Lightning by Nancy Pickard (Ballantine); Drive Time by Hank Phillippi Ryan (Mira); Truly, Madly by Heather Webber (St. Martin's Paperbacks).

And also take a look at those who got the nod for Best First Novel: The Long Quiche Goodbye by Avery Aames (Berkley); Murder at the PTA by Laura Alden (Obsidian); Maid of Murder by Amanda Flower (Five Star/Gale); Full Mortality by Sasscer Hill (Wildside Press); Diamonds for the Dead by Alan Orloff (Midnight Ink).

Louise Penny's Bury Your Dead revolves around Quebec's tangled history, friendships and debilitating grief.

In Nancy Pickard's The Scent of Rain and Lightning, a decades-old murder forces a community to deal with consequences.

A subplot of Alan Orloff's Diamonds for the Dead concerns his main character's feelings about his Jewish background and grief over his father's death and the time they wasted being mad at each other.

Each of these deals with how we live our lives.

The amateur sleuth subgenre has given us a view into a host of occupations such as cooks, bookstore owners, minimum wage employees and innkeepers. These novels give us a glimpse into worlds many of us will never know about. While these novels often are light, precise plotting, appealing characters and crisp dialogue keep them from being lightweight.

So here's a toast to the traditional mystery and fond wishes for a wonderful Malice Domestic.

Celebrate the Traditional Mystery
Oline Cogdill
celebrate-the-traditional-mystery

titleThis is a big week for mystery fiction lovers.

The Edgar Symposium begins Wednesday, April 27, at the Lighthouse International in New York City. Many top-notch authors and publishers will be there discussing the genre and its future. I'll be conducting the interview with Grand Master Sara Paretsky.

The 65th annual Edgar Awards banquet will be Thursday, April 28, at the Grand Hyatt in New York City. All the nominees are worthy.

And on Friday, April 29, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize will be awarded. I am delighted to say I was one of the judges for the mystery-thriller category.

Again, all the nominees are worthy.

And this also is the week that Malice Domestic begins on Friday, April 29, through May 1 at the Hyatt Regency in Bethesda, MD. This year, Sue Grafton will receive the Lifetime Achievement; Donna Andrews, at left, is the Toastmaster and Carole Nelson Douglas is the Guest of Honor.

This is the 23rd year for Malice, which celebrates the traditional mystery.

And I'd like to celebrate the traditional mystery.

In general, I believe that mystery fiction mirrors our society. These are novels that refect who we are, the struggles we have and how we deal with crime and punishment.

The traditional mystery especially does this. These novels often are about relationships and family issues. The best evidence of this are the nominees for the Agatha Awards. (Again, all the nominees are worthy.)

Take a look at those up for Best Novel: Stork Raving Mad by Donna Andrews (Minotaur); Bury Your Dead by Louise Penny (Minotaur); The Scent of Rain and Lightning by Nancy Pickard (Ballantine); Drive Time by Hank Phillippi Ryan (Mira); Truly, Madly by Heather Webber (St. Martin's Paperbacks).

And also take a look at those who got the nod for Best First Novel: The Long Quiche Goodbye by Avery Aames (Berkley); Murder at the PTA by Laura Alden (Obsidian); Maid of Murder by Amanda Flower (Five Star/Gale); Full Mortality by Sasscer Hill (Wildside Press); Diamonds for the Dead by Alan Orloff (Midnight Ink).

Louise Penny's Bury Your Dead revolves around Quebec's tangled history, friendships and debilitating grief.

In Nancy Pickard's The Scent of Rain and Lightning, a decades-old murder forces a community to deal with consequences.

A subplot of Alan Orloff's Diamonds for the Dead concerns his main character's feelings about his Jewish background and grief over his father's death and the time they wasted being mad at each other.

Each of these deals with how we live our lives.

The amateur sleuth subgenre has given us a view into a host of occupations such as cooks, bookstore owners, minimum wage employees and innkeepers. These novels give us a glimpse into worlds many of us will never know about. While these novels often are light, precise plotting, appealing characters and crisp dialogue keep them from being lightweight.

So here's a toast to the traditional mystery and fond wishes for a wonderful Malice Domestic.