Sunday, 05 June 2011 10:21

alt

This season of Law & Order: Criminal Intent is bittersweet.

I am thrilled that Criminal Intent has again reunited Detectives Goren (Vincent D’Onofrio) and Alexandra Eames (Kathryn Erbe), the original team and my personal favorites.

But it also saddens me that this 10th season will be Criminal Intent's last.

Criminal Intent airs at 9 pm Sundays on the USA Network.

I am a Law & Order junkie and can watch rerun after rerun of each of the spinoffs. I am a big fan of the original, or, as my husband calls it, the mothership. But Criminal Intent is my favorite.

Criminal Intent takes more risks with its plots and provocative themes by focusing on the criminals' actions and motives, rather than on the police and prosecutions.

Goren and Eames seamlessly return to the Major Case Squad, as if they never left. Last year, Goren was fired for insubordination and Eames quit. The lead detectives were then played by Jeff Goldblum and Saffron Burrows who were enjoyable, but they were not Goren and Eames.

The chemistry between Goren and Eames is pitch perfect for two professionals who respect each other, know each other's quirks and can guess each other's thoughts. I love the fact that they are not romantically involved and that Eames is Goren's boss.

Criminal Intent's last season is still taking chances. Joseph Hannah (Jay O. Sanders), a friend of Goren’s since their academy days, is the squad's new captain. Goren has mandatory sessions with a police psychologist to help him with his tortured past.

Character actor Sanders has been in every Law & Order, playing victims, criminals, attorneys and, I think, once a judge.

According to network reports, Criminal Intent's ninth season was strong, with 3.6 million total viewers to the series. Maybe if this season has equally strong viewership, Criminal Intent will have an 11th season. It's happened before.

And if that doesn't work, we'll always have Criminal Intent on DVD.

A special note to Kathryn Erbe if you are reading this: my husband and I were in front of you at the matinee of The House of Blue Leaves. I was the one who told you how much I have enjoyed your work and was happy that you were back on Criminal Intent.

Photo: Vincent D’Onofrio and Kathryn Erbe USA Network photo

Criminal Intent's Team Is Back
Oline Cogdill
criminal-intents-team-is-back

alt

This season of Law & Order: Criminal Intent is bittersweet.

I am thrilled that Criminal Intent has again reunited Detectives Goren (Vincent D’Onofrio) and Alexandra Eames (Kathryn Erbe), the original team and my personal favorites.

But it also saddens me that this 10th season will be Criminal Intent's last.

Criminal Intent airs at 9 pm Sundays on the USA Network.

I am a Law & Order junkie and can watch rerun after rerun of each of the spinoffs. I am a big fan of the original, or, as my husband calls it, the mothership. But Criminal Intent is my favorite.

Criminal Intent takes more risks with its plots and provocative themes by focusing on the criminals' actions and motives, rather than on the police and prosecutions.

Goren and Eames seamlessly return to the Major Case Squad, as if they never left. Last year, Goren was fired for insubordination and Eames quit. The lead detectives were then played by Jeff Goldblum and Saffron Burrows who were enjoyable, but they were not Goren and Eames.

The chemistry between Goren and Eames is pitch perfect for two professionals who respect each other, know each other's quirks and can guess each other's thoughts. I love the fact that they are not romantically involved and that Eames is Goren's boss.

Criminal Intent's last season is still taking chances. Joseph Hannah (Jay O. Sanders), a friend of Goren’s since their academy days, is the squad's new captain. Goren has mandatory sessions with a police psychologist to help him with his tortured past.

Character actor Sanders has been in every Law & Order, playing victims, criminals, attorneys and, I think, once a judge.

According to network reports, Criminal Intent's ninth season was strong, with 3.6 million total viewers to the series. Maybe if this season has equally strong viewership, Criminal Intent will have an 11th season. It's happened before.

And if that doesn't work, we'll always have Criminal Intent on DVD.

A special note to Kathryn Erbe if you are reading this: my husband and I were in front of you at the matinee of The House of Blue Leaves. I was the one who told you how much I have enjoyed your work and was happy that you were back on Criminal Intent.

Photo: Vincent D’Onofrio and Kathryn Erbe USA Network photo

Thursday, 02 June 2011 17:01

Arthur-Ellis-AwardThe Crime Writers of Canada (CWC) announced the winners for the 28th annual Arthur Ellis Awards on June 2, in Victoria, British Columbia. The Arthur Ellis is Canada’s premier award for excellence in crime writing. The 2011 awards are for books and short stories published in 2010. Crime Writers celebrate all facets of the genre, including crime, detective, espionage, mystery, suspense, or thriller, and include fictional or factual accounts of criminal doings and literary works with a criminal theme.

BEST NOVEL
Bury Your Dead, Louise Penny (Little, Brown UK)
[Read the Mystery Scene book review]

BEST SHORT STORY
“So Much in Common,” Mary Jane Maffini, Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine

BEST NONFICTION
On the Farm, Stevie Cameron (Knopf Canada)

BEST JUVENILE/ YOUNG ADULT
The Worst Thing She Ever Did, Alice Kuipers (HarperCollins)

BEST CRIME WRITING IN FRENCH
Dans le quartier des agités, Jacques Côté (Alire)

BEST FIRST NOVEL
The Debba, Avner Mandleman (Other Press)

UNHANGED ARTHUR (Best Unpublished First Crime Novel)
Better Off Dead, John Jeneroux

For additional information on Crime Writers Canada and the Arthur Ellis Awards: www.crimewriterscanada.com

2011 Arthur Ellis Award Winners Announced
Mystery Scene
the-2011-arthur-ellis-award-winners-announced

Arthur-Ellis-AwardThe Crime Writers of Canada (CWC) announced the winners for the 28th annual Arthur Ellis Awards on June 2, in Victoria, British Columbia. The Arthur Ellis is Canada’s premier award for excellence in crime writing. The 2011 awards are for books and short stories published in 2010. Crime Writers celebrate all facets of the genre, including crime, detective, espionage, mystery, suspense, or thriller, and include fictional or factual accounts of criminal doings and literary works with a criminal theme.

BEST NOVEL
Bury Your Dead, Louise Penny (Little, Brown UK)
[Read the Mystery Scene book review]

BEST SHORT STORY
“So Much in Common,” Mary Jane Maffini, Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine

BEST NONFICTION
On the Farm, Stevie Cameron (Knopf Canada)

BEST JUVENILE/ YOUNG ADULT
The Worst Thing She Ever Did, Alice Kuipers (HarperCollins)

BEST CRIME WRITING IN FRENCH
Dans le quartier des agités, Jacques Côté (Alire)

BEST FIRST NOVEL
The Debba, Avner Mandleman (Other Press)

UNHANGED ARTHUR (Best Unpublished First Crime Novel)
Better Off Dead, John Jeneroux

For additional information on Crime Writers Canada and the Arthur Ellis Awards: www.crimewriterscanada.com

Wednesday, 01 June 2011 10:26

altIf you have the newest issue of Mystery Scene—and I hope you have—perhaps you've read my interview with Kelli Stanley, which I hope you have.

(That's the Spring Issue, 2011, No. 119)

My interview with Kelli, left, starts with a walking tour of Chinatown in San Francisco, continues during a two-hour lunch of dim sum and continues with another trip through Chinatown.

I never ate so well during an interview. And while I had a wonderful time talking with Kelli—and enjoying the wonderful dim sum—the walking tour was just as valuable. Kelli gave me an upclose and personal view of the Chinatown setting for her Miranda Corbie novel City of Dragons. (Stanely's next San Francisco-based novel is City of Secrets, which comes out in September.)

I've been to San Francisco several times—it is one of my favorite American cities. And Chinatown is a must-stop on each of those trips.

altBut this was the first time I glimpsed some of the side streets with all its colorful aspects. The click of mah jong tiles from behind the screen doors in the basements. The laundry that hangs from some of the balconies. The cooking smells that come from bakeries, restaurants and apartments. All that shows up in City of Dragons.

Kelli gave me a view of Chinatown that I have never seen and may not have seen on my own.

And that is what often happens with mystery authors—they show us a part of their world we may never have seen without them.

Regardless of whether a novel takes place in San Francisco's Chinatown or New York's Chinatown, as do those novels by S.J. Rozan and Henry Chang, or a Virginia winery as do those novels by Ellen Crosby, or a small Illinois town as do those novels by Denise Swanson.

It's one of the things that mystery writers do best. And each region, each city, even those individual neighborhoods have distinct personalities.

Take Los Angeles.

Michael Connelly's Los Angeles is different from Robert Crais' Los Angeles, which is different from Denise Hamilton's Los Angeles, which is different from Robert Ellis' Los Angeles. Each author's view of Los Angeles can overlap, of course, but each also brings a unique perspective to their area.

And that is one of the things I love about mysteries.

Kelli Stanley: Author, Guide
Oline Cogdill
kelli-stanley-author-guide

altIf you have the newest issue of Mystery Scene—and I hope you have—perhaps you've read my interview with Kelli Stanley, which I hope you have.

(That's the Spring Issue, 2011, No. 119)

My interview with Kelli, left, starts with a walking tour of Chinatown in San Francisco, continues during a two-hour lunch of dim sum and continues with another trip through Chinatown.

I never ate so well during an interview. And while I had a wonderful time talking with Kelli—and enjoying the wonderful dim sum—the walking tour was just as valuable. Kelli gave me an upclose and personal view of the Chinatown setting for her Miranda Corbie novel City of Dragons. (Stanely's next San Francisco-based novel is City of Secrets, which comes out in September.)

I've been to San Francisco several times—it is one of my favorite American cities. And Chinatown is a must-stop on each of those trips.

altBut this was the first time I glimpsed some of the side streets with all its colorful aspects. The click of mah jong tiles from behind the screen doors in the basements. The laundry that hangs from some of the balconies. The cooking smells that come from bakeries, restaurants and apartments. All that shows up in City of Dragons.

Kelli gave me a view of Chinatown that I have never seen and may not have seen on my own.

And that is what often happens with mystery authors—they show us a part of their world we may never have seen without them.

Regardless of whether a novel takes place in San Francisco's Chinatown or New York's Chinatown, as do those novels by S.J. Rozan and Henry Chang, or a Virginia winery as do those novels by Ellen Crosby, or a small Illinois town as do those novels by Denise Swanson.

It's one of the things that mystery writers do best. And each region, each city, even those individual neighborhoods have distinct personalities.

Take Los Angeles.

Michael Connelly's Los Angeles is different from Robert Crais' Los Angeles, which is different from Denise Hamilton's Los Angeles, which is different from Robert Ellis' Los Angeles. Each author's view of Los Angeles can overlap, of course, but each also brings a unique perspective to their area.

And that is one of the things I love about mysteries.